Nampa Idaho History

The Idaho State Capitol is just a short drive from Boise and is one of the most valuable buildings in the state. Idaho has many beautifully restored railroad depots scattered across our state, but perhaps the most notable is the uniquely decorated structure in Nampa, Idaho. Although Idaho has many of them, this one is unique in Nampa because it is an ornamental structure.

Nampa, Idaho is not the only place in the world with that name, though many people believe it is. Historians say it was named after a Shoshone chief named Nampus, who, according to local legend, meant Bigfoot. The general consensus about Nampa's origins is that this is an Indian word for foot.

Nampa is also located in the Northwest, but it is also west of Idaho, north of the border with Mexico, south of Utah and east of Montana.

Copies of various records for Canyon County are available at the Nampa Public Library and the Idaho State Archive in Boise, Idaho. A copy of "Miscellaneous from Canyon County" is also available from the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, DC.

The original is located in the Canyon County Courthouse in Caldwell, Idaho, and can be viewed during a visit there. A copy of the existing Canyon County tax certificate lists should be available at the Idaho State Archives in Boise. The original can be seen from the Nampa Public Library and Caldwell County Courthouse in Idaho when traveling there, or you can see it from there and view it here.

The earliest records of probate cases were microfilmed and a copy is available at the Idaho State Archives in Boise, Idaho, and the Nampa Public Library in Idaho. The earliest records of Canyon County are microfilmed by the Idaho State Archives and can be viewed during a visit to the Archives of Boise Idaho or the naturalization index, which includes the original tax certificate lists as well as some of the early records from the county clerk's office.

Canyon County Idaho cemetery records go to the Idaho State Archives in Boise, Idaho, and the Nampa Public Library in Idaho. The links on this website usually lead directly to a copy of the original files of the county secretary or the county secretary of Canyon County.

Deaths and burials from Idaho from 1907 to 1965 are available at the Idaho State Archives in Boise, Idaho, and the Nampa Public Library in Idaho. The death records from 1907 to 1912 are microfilmed by the Family History Library and are also available at the Canyon County Cemetery Records Office in Nampa, Utah. The Idaho death and burial records from 1906-1965 and 1908-1964 are in the archives of the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, D.C., and microrecords of death and burial in Idaho are available. The death and burial records of Idaho County from 1909 to 1914 and from 1916 to 1924 are microfilms and can be obtained from the Boise County Historical Society, Mountain View Cemetery Office, or the Library of Congress.

Most of the information contained in the following story was compiled by Mary Henshall for the Idaho School Boards Association. She attended the University of Oregon for two years before marrying L. Douglas Hyslop Jr. in 1943. The Idaho State Archives in Boise, Idaho, and the Nampa Public Library in Idaho are available, as are microfilms from the Idaho County Historical Society, Mountain View Cemetery Office, and the Library of Congress. They are also available at the Canyon County Cemetery Records Office in Nampa, Utah.

Kassy's mother and grandmother have been die-hard customers of Homes for Idaho since they moved here from Montana, and they urged Kassy to contact them. Joe opened three more stores in Nampa over the next four years, one each over the next three years.

Part of the development that brought this about was the construction of a line for the Owyhee Railroad, which would run from Boise to Nampa and connect the mining towns in the owyhea Valley. With traffic growing, the Idaho Central Railway had to build a line to connect Boise, and part of that was the Oregon Short Line, built west and bypassing Boise by building a two-mile stretch from the city of Boise to Idaho Falls. She initially bypassed Tampa on her Route N Tampa, but the short distance reconsidered that decision. However, they found that a connecting line between Boise and the city of Fort Smith, Idaho, offered a much more convenient route than the Boise-to-Boise line.

The Oregon Short Rail Line bypassed Boise and reached the town of Fort Smith, Idaho, a few miles west of Nampa. This map shows the railroad that stood in the Owyhee Valley, about 30 miles east of Boise. The map shows the location of the Boise-to-Boise line, as well as the connection between the Idaho Central Railway and the Oregon Short Line.

More About Nampa

More About Nampa